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Accommodations for students with disabilities are not only required by law, but they provide students with equal access and the opportunity to be successful in their education. We know you want your students to be successful and the Disability Resource Center is here to support and assist you!

 How do I know a student needs accommodations: 

  • Students with disabilities register with the DRC and will receive a Student Accommodation Statement (SAS) listing all accommodations that the student may utilize
  • The student has the responsibility to give their SAS to their instructors at the beginning of each class or upon receipt of the statement
  • The instructor should privately discuss with the student the accommodations listed and which accommodations the student will need to utilize for each course

 

Note: Persons with the same disabilities will not always use the same accommodations

If an instructor suspects a student has a disability and may need accommodations, but hasn't received an SAS and doesn't know if they are registered with the DRC, please contact us. We are happy to support faculty and their students.

What accommodations might look like in your classroom:

Accommodations provide a student with an equal opportunity to obtain the same results, achievements and benefits that a student without a disability receives during their education at CNM. A reasonable accommodation is any modification, adjustment or auxiliary aid that enables a qualified student or employee with a disability to equitably participate. 

Types of accommodations may include: 

  • Changes made to the environment and/or to educational material to enable a person with a disability equal access
  • Adjustments and modifications to the way things are typically done
  • The use of assistive technology/devices

Note: Accommodations will be listed on the Student Accommodation Statement (SAS). Examples of specific accommodations are, but not limited to: 

  • Audio form of text
  • Extended test time
  • Changes in the length of time permitted to complete degree or course requirements
  • Service animals
  • Readers/Writers
  • Sign Language Interpreters
  • Adaptive technology

Students must advocate for themselves: 

  • Students with disabilities must self identify to the Disability Resource Center and provide diagnostic documentation in order to receive accommodations
  • All DRC staff encourages students to advocate for themselves
  • Students are responsible for giving their SAS to each instructor at the beginning of the term or upon receipt of a statement

Note: Accommodations may not be used retroactively

  • Students are encouraged to have meaningful conversations with their instructors about the accommodations that will be utilized during the course

If there are any questions, concerns, or issues please contact DRC staff for support    

Universal Design for Learning (UDL): 

UDL is an approach to teaching aimed at making a learning environment accessible to all students regardless of their age, size, or disability. This UDL link provides more information. 

Accessible course materials:

Instructors can use some of these tips to make courses accessible. If it gets overwhelming at any point, the DRC is happy to assist instructors through this process. Below are step by step instructions to increase accessibility.

Textbooks: 

 Whenever possible, instructors should choose textbooks that have an accessible digital version. If necessary, the Disability Resource Center (DRC) will make an accessible digital version of a textbook, which takes several weeks. 

If the text book is an eBook, instructors should ask if it's accessible: 

  • Supplemental information such as sidebars, images, charts and footnotes should be separate from the main content
  • Screen reader users need to be able to hear the main content without interruption, then choose to hear supplemental information
  • Content should not be presented only as an image because screen readers can't read images
  • A table of contents links to the text to make it easy to navigate through the book
  • Tables should have headers so screen reader users can find their place easily. Captions should also be provided that summarize the table
  • Images should have alternative text that explains the information in the image
  • Page numbers should be included that match the print version of the book
  • Math should be presented in MathML format so screen readers can read it
  • Video needs captions and audio needs transcripts
  • Interactive content should be accessible to screen reader users and keyboard only users

Videos:

Please choose videos that have closed captions if possible. Turn on captions when showing a video in class.

Search for a captioned version of the video.

  • Google
    1. Google Advanced Search
    2. scroll down to subtitles
    3. choose closed captioned only
  • YouTube
    1. search YouTube for the video
    2. Choose FILTER on the right
    3. under FEATURES choose Subtitles/CC.

Videos without captions need to be captioned. If a student who is deaf or hard of hearing registers for your class, the DRC will caption the videos. You may contact ewilson41@cnm.edu for any captioning. 

Studies have shown that students comprehend more and retain more information when a video has captions than students who view the same video without captions.

PDFs:

Some PDFs are scanned documents, meaning that they are an image of the text. Screen readers cannot access the text from this type of PDF. PDF's may be accessible if they were generated from an accessible document. Please see below for steps to making a document accessible. 

If an instructor is unsure if a PDF is accessible or not they can take the following steps: use Find in the Edit menu to search for a word you know is in the document. If the word isn't found, the PDF is a scan (not accessible). Please contact the DRC if the PDF is a scan so that we may help to make the PDF accessible. 

PowerPoints: 

PowerPoint will check itself for accessibility. Under the Review tab, choose Check Accessibility. If there are any issues, the Inspection Results will list how to correct each item that is not yet accessible. 

Images: 

Add alternative text to pictures, clip art, SmartArt graphics, shapes, and charts. 

  1. right-click on the image and select Format Picture... 
  2. select the Size & Properties tab in the Format pane
  3. enter a description in the Description field below the Title field

Links: 

Write meaningful link text that indicates where the link will go instead of "click here" or the URL.

  1. right-click on the link and choose Edit Hyperlink
  2. enter a description of where the link will go in the Text to Display field

  Colors: 

Please consider choosing colors with high contrast so that students who are colorblind can access all information. 

Videos: 

Please choose videos with captioning. If there aren't captions, please send a captioning request to the DRC. 

Slide Reading Order: 

Screen readers read content in the order in which it was added to a slide. Check reading order

  1. On the Home ribbon, select Arrange
  2. Choose Selection Pane
  3. The Section Pane appears, displaying the reading order in reverse
  4. Click and drag items to correct the reading order

Word: 

Word will check itself for accessibility. Under the Review tab, choose Check Accessibility. If there are any issues, the Inspection Results will list how to correct each item that is not yet accessible. 

Images:

Screen readers will read the alternative text instead of the filename. If the image is decorative, enter a space in the description.

  1. right-click on the image and select Format Picture... or Add Alt text
  2. enter a description in the Description field (not the Title field)

Headings: 

Screen readers have a shortcut command that lists all the headings on a page. This is a good way for the student to skim content.

Instead of using a larger/different font to make a heading, make your headings actual headings.

  1. go to the Headings Styles in the Home menu tab
  2. right-click on a heading level
  3. choose Modify

Links: 

If the document contains links, please write meaningful link text that describes where the link goes. 

  1. right-click the cell and choose Hyperlink
  2. in Text to Display, put meaningful link text that indicates where the link will go instead of "click here" or the URL.
  3. in the Address field, enter the URL

Tables: 

Use tables for data, not for layout. Screen readers read tables from left to right, top to bottom. 

  1. Click in the top row of the table
  2. Table Tools tab will display
  3. Click on the Table Design tab
  4. In the Table Style Options group on the left, check Header Row
  5. Click on the Layout tab
  6. Click on Repeat Header Row

Excel: 

Excel will check itself for accessibility. Under the Review tab, choose Check Accessibility. If there are any issues, the Inspection Results will list how to correct each item that is not yet accessible. Please note that screen readers read a spreadsheet from left to right and top to bottom. The screen reader announces which cell number it's on so that the student can navigate the spreadsheet. 

Links: 

If the spreadsheet contains links, please write meaningful link text that describes where the link goes. 

  1. right-click the cell and choose Hyperlink
  2. in Text to Display, put meaningful link text that indicates where the link will go instead of "click here" or the URL.
  3. in the Address field, enter the URL

 Colors: 

Please consider choosing colors with high contrast so that students who are colorblind can access all information. 

Sheet Tab Names: 

  1. right-click on the sheet tab
  2. choose Rename
  3. Enter a brief descriptive name