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Achievement Coach Program Continues to Expand

As the Spring 2012 term draws to a close and the stress of finals and graduation draw near, it's a good time to encourage students to visit an achievement coach. Coaches can aid with not only academic stress but also dealing with life issues and the school/life balance.

Aug 30, 2016

April 2012

As the Spring 2012 term draws to a close and the stress of finals and graduation draw near, it's a good time to encourage students to visit an achievement coach. Coaches can aid with not only academic stress but also dealing with life issues and the school/life balance.

Since CNM's Achievement Coach program began in 1996 with a coach in the School of Applied Technologies, it's grown to over 17 coaches throughout CNM. Each school has at least one coach and the CNM Connect program currently has 10 coaches, including one at every campus.

Some of the services provided by coaches include academic coaching and intervention; guidance on careers and transitions; department and program orientation activities; mentoring; providing referrals to resources both internal and external to CNM; and informational presentations and workshops. The workshops that coaches organize are geared toward current students and include topics such as dealing with test anxiety, time management, knowing your learning style, study skills and many more.

Achievement coaches are trained to provide a high level of guidance to students. Ten of the coaches are currently in the process of becoming certified coaches through the Center for Credentialing and Education, which offers certifications in a variety of education-related fields.

Shelby McCorkle, achievement coach at the Westside Campus, said that to earn the certification through the Center for Credentialing and Education "you have to have a certain number of hours both in training approved by the credentialing center as well as a certain number of hours coaching as an individual."

Some coaches are also certified through Coach U, a leading training program for academic and corporate coaches.

McCorkle said that working with the students and helping them discover their own successful path is the most fulfilling part of being an achievement coach.

"We're not advice-givers; we're not advisors," she said. "We want students to develop their own answers, their own pathways."

Working with an Achievement Coach is one of the requirements for recipients of the Rust Opportunity Scholarship from the CNM Foundation. The scholarship is awarded to students who have faced an emergency financial situation and need assistance to continue on in school.

"I think that it's becoming a more used resource, the more students that we get," McCorkle said. "We definitely have our peak times – the first month and a half, two months of the term, and the last part of the term."
There is currently an opening for an achievement coach in the School of Health, Wellness & Public Safety.