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CNM Libraries Making Global Connections

CNM Libraries are working with the Albuquerque Sister Cities chapter to strengthen bonds with Sister Libraries across the globe. In the past month, CNM Libraries has connected with Ashgabat, Turkmenistan, and Sasebo, Japan.

Aug 30, 2016

CNM Libraries are working with the Albuquerque Sister Cities chapter to strengthen bonds with Sister Libraries across the globe.  In the past month, CNM Libraries has connected with Ashgabat, Turkmenistan, and Sasebo, Japan.

Alana McGrattan, a Reference Specialist at the Rio Rancho campus library, is an active member of the local Sister Cities chapter, and traveled to Ashgabat with an Albuquerque delegation during the 2009 Independence Day celebrations in Turkmenistan.

Ms. McGrattan helped select and ship books from the United States to the National Library in Turkmenistan.  After seeing the condition of libraries in Turkmenistan firsthand, Ms. McGrattan returned to the United States with renewed commitment to increasing collaboration.

While American librarians are interested in supporting their colleagues abroad, interest and generosity has been extended both ways.  Albuquerque libraries recently received a donation of books from the National Library of Turkmenistan.  The books were presented during Nowruz, a Persian New Year celebration, held on Saturday, March 19, 2011, at the Manzano Mesa Multigenerational Center, in Albuquerque. 

Representatives from the ABC Library system, UNM Libraries, and CNM Libraries were on hand to receive the books for their respective organizations.

In addition to the book exchange with Ashgabat, CNM Libraries has developed a project to reach out to Sasebo, our sister city in Japan.

Ms. Johnson-Renvall organized a two-pronged program for CNM Libraries.  The first step was an origami display coupled with instructions for disaster donations.  “When I heard about the tsunami and earthquake in Japan, I immediately wanted to bring awareness to their tragedy and also show support for the Japanese people. The Japanese crane is a symbol of peace, luck, and well wishes, so folding the cranes and telling people how to donate to the Red Cross seemed to go hand in hand. The cranes have been very well received and many library patrons have folded cranes to add to the library’s collection.”

The second prong in the program is making banners available in all campus libraries for students and other community members to sign their wishes of peace and healing to the people of Japan.  The outpouring of student support has been wonderful.  Kaumi Kawakubo, chair of the local Sister Cities Sasebo Committee agrees, emphasizing that this is “such a kind gesture of CNM Libraries.”  Ms. Johnson-Renvall adds, “It shows that CNM students, faculty and staff are global citizens and really care about what happens to people around the world.”