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New Board Member Gets Sworn in on March 8

The CNM Governing Board will take a new shape on March 8, when Mark Armijo will be sworn in as the new Governing Board representative for District 4. Mr. Armijo was voted into the seat in the Feb. 1 election, and will replace District 4 Board member Carmie Toulouse, who has served on the Board for the past 12 years.

Aug 31, 2016

March 2011

Mark D. Armijo
The CNM Governing Board will take a new shape on March 8, when Mark Armijo will be sworn in as the new Governing Board representative for District 4. Mr. Armijo was voted into the seat in the Feb. 1 election, and will replace District 4 Board member Carmie Toulouse, who has served on the Board for the past 12 years.

Mr. Armijo, a South Valley native, will represent the South Valley and the Southeast Heights east to Eubank.

"I will listen to my constituents and represent them on the Board," Armijo said. "I feel like I understand my constituents' needs and I think I have a good feel for people's education needs in the community. I want to help inform people about all of the opportunities that are available to them at CNM."

Mr. Armijo, currently the President of the Governance Board for Nuestros Valores Charter School in the South Valley, said he was partly influenced to run for the CNM Governing Board "to continue my mom's work."

His late mother, Pauline Armijo, taught elementary education for Albuquerque Public Schools and for Laguna Pueblo, Tesuque Pueblo and Zia Pueblo.

"My mother always stressed the importance of education and how it can make a huge difference in your life," Mr. Armijo said. "She went to college later in life, so I saw how she struggled and worked so hard to go to school."

Mr. Armijo, a Rio Grande High graduate, is the President of the Pauline Armijo Scholarship Fund, which provides support to non-traditional female students seeking a degree in the education field.

He says he also ran for the CNM Governing Board because it provides such a broad platform to support education.

"Everybody knows somebody who has been positively impacted by CNM," he said. "It touches every aspect of our community, from high school kids taking dual credit classes to people coming back to school after a long period of time because they're underemployed or out of a job."

"Community colleges play a very important role. Not every student is cut out for a university environment. A lot of people I know wouldn't be as successful as they are if it wasn't for the great trades programs that CNM offers."

Mr. Armijo, currently a programmer analyst for the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority, took a manufacturing class at CNM when he was an employee at General Mills. He also worked at Intel, where he took on-site robotics courses from CNM instructor Fabian Lopez, his uncle.

Mr. Armijo says he expects that budget issues will be a prominent area of focus when he begins his work on the Board after being sworn in on March 8, when the regular monthly Governing Board meeting will take place at 5 p.m. on Main Campus in the Student Resource Center.

During his upcoming four-year term, he said he hopes to support the college in making more progress in forging partnerships with K-12 schools and universities to improve and increase education opportunities. He also hopes to support efforts to partner with more local businesses and industries to help improve the region's economy.

"CNM has always played that role, but I'd like to see CNM become even more prevalent in economic development," he said.