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Record Number of High School Students in Dual Credit

The number of high school students taking college-level courses through the CNM Dual Credit program is once again on the rise. For the current fall term, 1,476 students are enrolled in CNM dual credit classes, an all-time record for the program and an increase of about 200 students from the fall 2010 term.

Aug 30, 2016

October 2011 

The number of high school students taking college-level courses through the CNM Dual Credit program is once again on the rise. For the current fall term, 1,476 students are enrolled in CNM dual credit classes, an all-time record for the program and an increase of about 200 students from the fall 2010 term.

High school students participating in the CNM Dual Credit program take CNM classes that count for both high school and college credit, providing high school students with a valuable jump start on a higher education.

From the 2009-10 academic year to the 2010-11 academic year, Dual Credit enrollment increased by 20 percent.

Julie Fisher, CNM School Relations interim director, said that a large contributing factor to the growth of the program is that some students can now take dual credit courses on their high school campus. Through the Dual Credit in the High School program, high school instructors who meet CNM hiring standards can instruct a course at the high school. Classes are taught by high school instructors at seven high schools and by CNM instructors at four highs schools.

Another factor of the program's success is the growth in popularity of the Finance 1010 class, also called "Making Money Work." The course educates students about the financial decisions they will soon start to make that will shape their financial future, and in turn, the quality of their adult lives.

The course is also taught online by a CNM instructor, is offered at over 20 schools and reaches high schools in Albuquerque and Rio Rancho, as well as high schools in Cuba, Socorro, Vaughn, Moriarty and more.

"Our goal is to take Financial Literacy 1010 statewide to help more students develop fiscal responsibility," Fisher said.

This term, 62 percent of dual credit students are taking their courses on their high school campus through both the Dual Credit in the High School and Making Money Work programs.

The state of New Mexico now requires high school students beginning with the class of 2013 to meet a new set of criteria in order to graduate from New Mexico high schools. According to the new state law, students will be required to take an advanced placement, honors, distance learning or dual credit course before they graduate.

"The success of the program is that high school principals and administrators are truly interested in helping students meet this requirement. I think dual credit is going to continue to grow," Fisher said.

Fisher said that she and Jessica Smyser, School Relations coordinator, have put a lot of effort into developing relationships with high school administrators to offer their students access to college-level courses at as many schools as possible, as well as online.

CNM has witnessed many dual credit success stories, including a number of students who have graduated from high school with a CNM associate's degree in hand. During the 2009-10 academic year, the program awarded 21 certificates and five associate's degrees to dual credit students.

Tuition is free for students from participating high schools, and arts and sciences courses are transferable to the University of New Mexico and other four-year institutions in New Mexico.