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Student Resource Center Racking Up Recognitions

The Main Campus Student Resource Center has already earned high marks around CNM and in the community for its aesthetically pleasing design and the optimal learning environments it provides for students. In recent months, however, the SRC has earned high praise from a much broader range of admirers.

Aug 31, 2016

October 2011

Student Services Center
The Main Campus Student Resource Center has already earned high marks around CNM and in the community for its aesthetically pleasing design and the optimal learning environments it provides for students. In recent months, however, the SRC has earned high praise from a much broader range of admirers.

The SRC, which opened in August 2010, has recently earned award recognitions from four different organizations. The 106,500-square-foot SRC houses the Main Campus Library, the Assistance Centers for Education (tutoring services), classrooms, computer labs, conference rooms, study areas, a café and the Office of Information Technology Services. The building is technology rich and it's under consideration for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver certification for a wide variety of eco-friendly features.

So far, the SRC, which was designed by AECOM architecture under the guidance of CNM, has earned the following recognitions:

2011 Special Recognition Award, N.M. Chapter of the American Institute of Architects: This award recognizes distinguished architectural achievement. One judge called it a "dramatic front porch for the campus." Luis Campos, CNM's executive director of the Physical Plant, Lou Castillo, CNM director of Construction Services, and Myrna Marquez, lead project manager of the Physical Plant, attended the award ceremony.

2011 "Design Is ..." Award from Shaw Contract Group: This award recognizes the vision for momentous work. A $2,000 scholarship donation was awarded in AECOM's name to CNM.

2011 Award of Merit from International Interior Design Association Southwest Chapter, PRIDE Awards: This award recognizes projects with exceptional design quality in the member states of Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada.

2011 ENR Southwest Award of Merit – Best Higher Education Project: Winning projects were selected from 130 entries that were evaluated by 15 judges using five criteria, including innovation, teamwork, functionality of the design and quality. Judges included engineers, architects, general contractors, subcontractors and developers. The SRC will be featured in the Nov. 14 issue of Engineering News-Record Southwest magazine.

Some of the environmentally friendly features that have helped the SRC earn recognition and that will earn the SRC points toward LEED certification include:

  • Large windows that let in light and provide views of the natural environment. There is little need for artificial lighting in the SRC during the day. Most rooms are lit naturally from dawn to dusk. Light sensors turn on lights after dusk or when it's overcast. Most of the light bulbs in the SRC are light-emitting diodes (LED), which use less energy and last longer.
  • Recycled materials are used throughout the SRC, such as in glass, tile floors, countertops and other building materials.
  • Paint, carpet and other building materials are low in volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which have negative impacts on humans and the environment.
  • The building is positioned to absorb more sunlight in the winter and less in the summer to aid heating/cooling.
  • Native plants are used in landscaping and rain drainage will be directed to landscaped areas to reduce the need for watering.
  • Bamboo, a rapidly renewable resource, is used for all interior wood trim. Bamboo is one of the fastest-growing plants on earth and is easily replenished once it develops a root system, making it one of the most sustainable products used in the SRC.
  • Heat-neutralizing techniques are used in landscaping and the roofing. The roof of the SRC is white, which helps reduce cooling costs by reflecting sunlight instead of absorbing it. The use of sod and grass in the area to the north of the SRC also disperses the heat of the sun and earns LEED points for preserving some green space.