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Women in Non-Traditional Careers Honored

The CNM Chapter of the American Association for Women in Community Colleges (AAWCC) hosted its annual Women in Non-Traditional Careers Awards Reception on March 24 in the Student Resource Center on Main Campus. The awards acknowledge the successes of students or teachers excelling in non-traditional program areas.

Sep 07, 2016

Women in Non-Traditional Careers
The CNM Chapter of the American Association for Women in Community Colleges (AAWCC) hosted its annual Women in Non-Traditional Careers Awards Reception on March 24 in the Student Resource Center on Main Campus. The awards acknowledge the successes of students or teachers excelling in non-traditional program areas.

Guests at the event were welcomed by CNM president Kathie Winograd and award presentations were emceed by Erica Volkers, president of the CNM chapter of AAWCC.

Roxanne Rivera
Roxanne Rivera, president and CEO of the Associated Builders and Contractors of New Mexico and author of There's No Crying in Business: How Women Can Succeed in Male-Dominated Industries, was the keynote speaker. She entertained and informed an enthusiastic audience of award winners and their friends and families, plus numerous CNM faculty and staff members. Her address spanned her 30 years as a pioneer in the construction industry, starting at a time when the only females involved were secretaries and ending with today's increasing opportunities for women in all facets of the business. The talk was livened by many amusing observations on the differences between male and female communication styles.

The award winners came from many traditionally male-dominated fields.

The WIN 2011 Student of the Year is Cheryl Douglas from the Electrical Trades program; the award honors her for achieving a skill level respected by her peers, demonstrating her commitment to education and showing a passion for her chosen field.

School of Applied Technologies instructors Phyllis Cece and Rita Rocca represented the Architectural/Engineering Drafting program, and were recognized for their roles as teachers, mentors and advocates for women's success in non-traditional career programs. Two recipients were honored as outstanding students: Alice Shriver (electronics/construction management) and Hollie Padilla (plumbing/air conditioning, heating & refrigeration). High school junior and dual credit student Maya Robinson was chosen as a student of promise; she's enrolled in the Aviation Technology program and has already earned 60 credits toward her career goals in engineering.

Construction management student Katey Kendrick was named as student advocate, recognizing her encouragement and support of women pursuing non-traditional pathways. Jennifer Shroulote won the award for future leader; she is majoring in Automotive Technologies.

In addition to certificates honoring their achievements, winners received gift cards related to their career programs from a number of donor businesses and organizations. They were also presented with special medallions engraved by the CNM Machine Tool program and Kokopelli statuettes crafted by welding instructor Kay Hamby and her students and work-studies.

With so many outstanding nominees, the judges also named seven people for honorable mention: students Mary Hockett (Construction Management), Christina Horton (Carpentry), Angela James (Geographic Information Technology), Sheryl Lovato (Automotive Technology) and Holly Roth (Geographic Information Technology/Construction Management) and CNM staffers Tamra Mason (associate dean of the School of Math, Science & Engineering) and Ronald Forstbauer (applied math tutor).