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General Honors Preview Nights

FALL PREVIEW NIGHTS!

During Fall semester of 2014, CNM will offer two sections of The Ancient Legacy (one offered online), two sections of The Modern Legacy and one section of Understanding Evil. Course descriptions are as follows:

CRN 76448:GNHN 1121- 101: The Ancient Legacy (MW 1:30-2:45) Instructor: Erin Lebacqz elebacqz@cnm.edu

 

How did ancient societies grapple with the question of creation, and what do their proposed answers, stories, and myths say about how we fit in on earth and why we are here? Further, how do ancient texts propose we should best live in our natural environment and in our various social and political environments? This course will explore humankind’s greatest and earliest questions through both Western and Eastern ancient texts. Readings will include complete works and/or excerpts from Plato, St. Augustine, The Bible, Dante, The Bhagavad Gita, Confucius, Sappho, and the Dao de jing.

CRN 76609: GNHN 1121- 51: The Ancient Legacy (online) Instructor: Erin Lebacqz elebacqz@cnm.edu

How did ancient societies grapple with the question of creation, and what do their proposed answers, stories, and myths say about how we fit in on earth and why we are here? Further, how do ancient texts propose we should best live in our natural environment and in our various social and political environments? This course will explore humankind’s greatest and earliest questions through both Western and Eastern ancient texts. Readings will include complete works and/or excerpts from Plato, St. Augustine, The Bible, Dante, The Bhagavad Gita, Confucius, Sappho, and the Dao de jing.


CRN 76450: GNHN 1122-201: The Modern Legacy (W 6-8:45pm at Montoya Campus) Instructor: David Lawrence dlawrence10@cnm.edu

In the age of the First Amendment and religious pluralism in the United States, how do we see religion in our lives, and how did previous generations take religious practices into account in their lives? Over the course of the semester, we will investigate a wide variety of writers from Shakespeare to Thomas Merton.  Hopefully we will begin to answer some of the following questions:  How did people see god/God, and did religion necessarily correlate to a faithful existence?  Why are their ideas of the divine important, and did their views of the divine impact one’s daily life?  Did religion inspire, or create fear?  How do we connect these differing ideas of religion and faith into the 21st century?  This course is designed to reward students for their hard work and endeavors during their time at CNM.  I have structured the course around challenging, but beneficial readings, and short writing assignments. 

CRN 76449: GNHN 1122-51: The Modern Legacy: (Online) Instructor: Cecily Kuehl Shank cshank2@cnm.edu

Tough Mama's Kids: examining humanity's relationship with mothers and nature. How are we working with and/or against nature's rules? Are we nature's entitled rebel children or her loving grown-up caretaker children? How do we perceive mothers, and does that view affect our treatment of the earth? What effect does the quality of our relationship with nature have on our treatment of the planet's resources?

 

CRN 76451: GNHN 2221-301: Understanding Evil (TR 1:30-2:45 at Westside Campus) Instructor: Jeff Salbato jsalbato@cnm.edu

What this course is REALLY about: I have this strange growing fetish for protecting those who suffer (yes, “fetish” is the proper term when narcissism is the norm).  As such, I am driven to understand as much as I can about the causes of the most alarming instances of suffering: those caused by other human beings.  So, what do I do when my questions about evil and the stacks of books that might answer them are growing faster than my ability to tackle them?  I create a class so that I can gather together a bunch of brilliant students to help me.  Here are the main questions we’ll be seeking answers for:

  • Are humans naturally good or bad?  Are humans good or bad in society?
  • What motivates/enables human beings to carry out acts of evil?
  • What compels the vast majority of people to remain bystanders?
  • What compels certain people to devote themselves to being rescuers and how can we foster a rescuer culture in our society?

To help you decide amongst the offered classes, this Spring we are holding three Honors Previews. In the Previews, you can meet the instructors, look at texts and syllabi, and even interview on the spot if you wish. The dates, times, and locations are as follows:

                         Wed, July 9 at Main Campus, 1-2pm, MS 217
                        Thurs, July 10 at Main Campus, 1-2pm, MS 217
                        Thurs, July 10, 2-3pm at Westside Campus, MJG 122

If you can’t make it to an Honors Preview, just email the teacher of the section you are interested in. You do not need to attend a Preview to get into an Honors class.

Drop in any time during these soon to be posted hours. Instructors will be on hand to answer your questions and sign Permission to Enroll forms.

Bring your Honors letter along to verify eligibility.

We hope to see you there!