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General Honors Course Previews

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To help you decide among the offered classes, we are asking you to contact each instructor directly. Email your instructor with the address provided in the class description and attach a copy of your Honors letter.

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Fall 2019 GNHN Course Offerings

CRN 76538 GNHN 1021, Section 101:  The Legacy Seminar: The Legacy of the City. (MW 9:00 10:15am, Main) Instructor: Jamie Denison (jdenison1@cnm.edu)

Polis is the Ancient Greek word for “city,” but it denotes the organization of government and economy of the city-state. Hence, the word “politics” is derived from polis, yet we tend to think of politics as divorced from our local communities and applied to larger, “imagined” communities, e.g. nation-states or the states of the United States. However, the Greek connotation of polis maintains the idea of politics as the search for the communal good that is grounded in the material and ideological practices of the city, thus resisting our disembodied conceptions that get lost in media and popular political discourse. In this seminar, we will explore this concept of the city as a crucial site of the political, where issues such as production, transportation, preservation, public space, and architecture signify the values and direction of those composing the community. In Part I, we will explore the Greek concept of the polis as it emerges from two major sources of political thought, Plato and Aristotle. In Part II, we then move on to Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, and Virginia Held, who focus on political thought while maintaining the importance of the material practices and local communities that underlie ideology. In Part III, we will finish by looking at theorists who discuss the political importance of city design and local politics, and we will finish up in the last week discussing the current issues facing Albuquerque and the communal values that are implicit in these struggles (which will be the basis of your final paper)

CRN 77312:  GNHN 2203, Section 101:  Science in the 21st Century.  (T/R 8:30 10:15, Main) Instructor:  Melanie Will-Cole (mwillcole@cn.edu)

This course focuses on how climate works and how it’s changing from a science perspective. Through seminar-based discussions and investigative laboratory activities, students will explore the mechanics of climate; evaluate methods and archives used to reconstruct climate in the past; learn how scientists use models, observations, and theory to make predictions about future climate; discuss possible consequences of climate change for our planet and society. Analysis, evaluation and critical thinking are reemphasized.

CRN 77354:  GNHN 2204, Section 101:  Individual & Collective: Tea Rooms to Picket Lines: Journeys of 20th Century Woman Activists (T/R 9:00-10:15 AM, Main) Instructor:  Ellen Cain (ecain2@cnm.edu)

In this course, we’ll explore connections between personal experience and publication for a variety of twentieth-century activists: women fighting for social-justice causes such as the vote, labor rights, and civil rights. We will examine activists’ descriptions of their own lives, as well as how their legacies have been memorialized in museums, monuments, and other types of commemoration. 

Spring 2020 GNHN Course Offerings

CRN 86461:  GNHN 1021, Section 101:  The Legacy Seminar: The Legacy of Propaganda (MW 3:00 – 4:15, Main) Instructor:  Monique Lacoste (mlacoste@cnm.edu

The focus of this class is on the history, nature, and uses of propaganda. In this course, we will examine theories and examples of propaganda, evaluate how it has evolved from antiquity to the modern age, and analyze how propaganda functions as a tool of mass persuasion. We will focus on how the growth of civilization and development of new and varied communication technologies over time have led to the increasing sophistication of propaganda techniques in the ongoing battle for control of cultural and political ideologies. This course will encourage a deep understanding of the evolution and functions of propaganda, how propaganda operates in all forms of mass communication in the modern world, how to read and respond to different forms of propaganda, and the challenges propaganda presents to critical thought and responsible citizenship in the 21st century.

CRN 86648:  GNHN 2201, Section 101:  Rhetoric and Discourse:  The Rhetoric of Protest:  Social Activism and the Shaping of U.S. Democracy (T/R 9:00-10:15 AM, Main) Instructor:  Marissa Juarez (mjuarez8@cnm.edu)

Social activism has gained increasing visibility in the public sphere lately, as movements like Occupy, Black Lives Matter, United We Dream, #NoDAPL, MeToo, Never Again, and others have used public protest to call for equity, justice, and reform. In fact, in a recent article in The Guardian, journalist LA Kauffman asserts that “we are in an extraordinary era of protest,” noting that the past two years have seen unprecedented levels of civic action for social causes. As these protests become a point of contention within our social discourse, it’s important to remember that, historically, many groups and individuals have advocated for civil disobedience to effect meaningful social change within U.S. democracy. This course will explore the power of protest in the ongoing fight for equality. Specifically, students will investigate a variety of social movements and protest texts throughout history—beginning with the American Revolution and ending with texts from present-day activist movements—in order to understand the broader contexts of these messages and their lasting effects. Because protest takes place in a multitude of forms and media, the texts we explore in this class will necessarily move beyond the written word and into the realm of speech, performance, and visual artifacts. Likewise, students will compose assignments in multiple media, including rhetorical analysis, student-led discussions and presentations, posters, and manifestos.

CRN 86649:  GNHN 2207, Section 101:  Fine Arts as Global Perspective (M/W9:00-10:15 AM, Main) Instructor:  Jennifer Rush (jhenrichs@cnm.edu)

Transcendental, otherworldly, and infused with mysticism, the fruits of the human impulse to create often challenge our limited concepts of reality. As modern advanced human beings, we are only just now starting to fully discern the vital role art plays in the interconnectedness of the body, mind, emotions, and spirit. Austrian philosopher Rudolf Steiner saw learning as an experiential, organic process that allowed for intuitive connection making. Steiner's philosophy of Anthroposophy offers a unique aesthetic perspective derived from nineteenth century German idealism, mysticism, and a strong innate sense of stewardship towards the natural world. This seminar will focus on the integral process of building knowledge through inquiry in the arts via Anthroposophy. We will critically examine links between art and the body's way of knowing, creativity, observation, holistic learning, imagination, literature, and spirituality. 

CRN 86737:  GNHN 2205, Section 101:  Humanities in Society and Culture (T/R 3:00 4:15, Main) Instructor:  Sue Taylor (staylor61@cnm.edu

In this class, we will examine the historical roots of the conditions in Central America that have created the immigration crises of the 21st century. Specifically, we will explore the impact of interventions by the United States in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala during the Cold War, asking what the connections between U. S. intervention and the current crisis are.

Summer 2020 GNHN Course Offerings

CRN 92161 GNHN 1021, Section 101:  The Legacy Seminar: The Legacy of the City. (MW 9:30 11:15am, Main) Instructor: Jamie Denison (jdenison1@cnm.edu)

Polis is the Ancient Greek word for “city,” but it denotes the organization of government and economy of the city-state. Hence, the word “politics” is derived from polis, yet we tend to think of politics as divorced from our local communities and applied to larger, “imagined” communities, e.g. nation-states or the states of the United States. However, the Greek connotation of polis maintains the idea of politics as the search for the communal good that is grounded in the material and ideological practices of the city, thus resisting our disembodied conceptions that get lost in media and popular political discourse. In this seminar, we will explore this concept of the city as a crucial site of the political, where issues such as production, transportation, preservation, public space, and architecture signify the values and direction of those composing the community. In Part I, we will explore the Greek concept of the polis as it emerges from two major sources of political thought, Plato and Aristotle. In Part II, we then move on to Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, and Virginia Held, who focus on political thought while maintaining the importance of the material practices and local communities that underlie ideology. In Part III, we will finish by looking at theorists who discuss the political importance of city design and local politics, and we will finish up in the last week discussing the current issues facing Albuquerque and the communal values that are implicit in these struggles (which will be the basis of your final paper)